A troubled young woman, having grown up in one of the least desirable areas of Toronto and having been born into an unbreakable cycle of poverty,

addiction, and crime, decides to seek out her old best friend. They have both changed so much since they last saw each other that she hardly recognizes her when

Getting away It was high time. The move to Toronto had been more of a hassle than anything else and now...here she was, standing in front of her father’s door.

He’d left it unlocked again and she slipped inside, shaking her head at his carelessness. She never would have expected

him to be so thoughtless as to leave his door open in a dangerous neighborhood. In fact, he hadn’t even installed deadbolt locks for his own safety;

he wouldn’t even wear them when she asked him to! Perhaps it wasn’t really that he didn’t care about security...perhaps he just didn’t care about much at all anymore.

he wouldn’t even wear them when she asked him to! Perhaps it wasn’t really that he didn’t care about security...perhaps he just didn’t care about much at all anymore.

Figuring it out Most movies about cancer follow one of two trajectories: One is to offer hope, essentially saying that with enough love and positive thinking and optimism

, you can beat cancer. That film could be loosely described as Jerry Maguire for terminal illness. The other kind is more along the lines of Dallas

Buyers Club, in which disease brings out an intense, hard-driving will to live in someone previously lacking direction or determination

. Erin Rigby's new movie follows neither path; instead, it takes a look at what it's like to try to find your way back home after years on life's road less traveled.